Theatre Royal Drury Lane Box Office

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Address: Theatre Royal Drury Lane, Catherine Street, London, WC2B 5JF

Tube lines: Piccadilly

Nearest tube: Covent Garden

Directions from Covent Garden:

(5mins) Go right on Long Acre; turn right into Bow Street and after 100 metres it will be on your left in Russell Street/Catherine Street.

Nearest rail: Charing Cross

Bus routes: (Aldwych) 6, 11, 13, 23, 59, 68, 87, 171, 172, 188, RV1, X68

Night buses: (Aldwych) 6, 23, 188, N11, N13, N26, N47, N68, N87, N89, N155, N171, N551

Car park: Drury Lane, Parker Street (5mins)

In congestion zone?: Yes

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Please note: The location shown on the map is an approximate location of the theatre. In the majority of cases the theatre will be marked on the map so please make sure you locate the exact location yourself. If the theatre is not shown on the map please make sure you locate the correct road name and take account of the directions.


What's On at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane


Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Roald Dahl's deliciously dark tale of young Charlie Bucket and the mysterious confectioner Mr Willy Wonka comes to life in a brand new West End musical dire... more →

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Theatre Royal Drury Lane Information

Getting There

By Car

If you are driving, there are NCP car parks at the following addresses:

Covent Garden
Parker Street, Parker Mews, London, WC2B 5NT

Brewer
Brewer Street, London, W1F 0LA

Shaftesbury
Selkirk House, Museum Street, London, WC1A 1JP

You can see these, and other NCP car parks on their website http://www.ncp.co.uk/

However, you can participate in the Q-Parks Theatreland Parking Scheme and get 50% off your parking costs by validating your parking ticket in the foyer at the theatre.

For more information on Q-Parks Theatreland Parking Scheme either call +44 (0)870 442 0104 or visit Q-Parks website http://www.q-park.co.uk/theatreland

The closest participating car park for the Drury Lane Theatre Royal is at 20 Newport Place, London, WC2H 7PR. The rates for this car park are £6.50 per hour, up to 4 hours, and after that it is £38 for up to 24 hours.

Don't forget to pay the £11.50 (£1 less if you register, but that costs you £10 for a car) daily congestion charge for central London which applies from 7am to 6pm Monday to Friday, excluding public holidays, if you are driving into London.

Alternatively, plan your journey using Transport for London journey planner https://tfl.gov.uk/plan-a-journey/

Access

Disabled visitors are able to book directly with the Access team – call on +44 (0) 8444 124648.

There are 6 steps at the front of the theatre leading into the main foyer where the box office is situated. There are steps to the Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle.

For wheelchair access to the theatre, you will need to contact the theatre Manager. Entrance will be from Russell Street, and this will lead directly into the Stalls. There are 4 wheelchair spaces and companions can sit on the same row. There are also disabled toilets accessed from the Russell Street doors.

Refreshments and drinks can be delivered to the auditorium. There are steps down from the stalls to the stalls bar.

Hearing assisted headsets are available from the Box Office in the foyer.

Assistance dogs are allowed in the theatre, and it is also possible for staff to dog-sit up to 4 dogs during the performance.

In The Area

Cash/ATM – Nat West is at 65 Aldwych (approx. 5 minute walk from the theatre); HSBC at 16 Kings St (approx. 6 minute walk); Barclays is at 366 Strand (approx. 4 minute walk).

Eating – There is a wide choice of eateries very close to the theatre, including Loch Fyne, Hi Sushi Izakaya, Augustus Harris & Sagar Covent Garden, all on Catherine Street.

Drinking – Nell of Old Drury, with an underground tunnel, is on Catherine St; Be At One on Russell St – also offers Cocktail Mixing Masterclasses; The Globe on Bow St – also offers bistro dining; for something a little more sober there is Double Shot Coffee Co on Tavistock Road, and Charles Dickens Coffee House on Wellington Street.

About

Built in 1663, the theatre is an ornate Georgian building which, since the 1920s has hosted predominantly mainstream musicals, which include American musicals such as Show Boat, and more recently Miss Saigon, Shrek the Musical & Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. The theatre boasts two Royal boxes and both the National Anthem and Rule Britannia were played to the public in the theatre.

History

The original theatre was small, approximately the size of the stage is in the current building. The building was burnt down in 1672 and a second theatre was built, again by Thomas Killigrew, which opened in 1674. This theatre continued for 117 years until 1791. The second building was replaced by a larger theatre, able to seat over 3,500 people, which was designed by Henry Holland and opened in March 1794 with a performance of music by Handel. This building incorporated the first safety curtain used anywhere in the world, but that sadly did not prevent another fire destroying the theatre in 1809.

The current building, the fourth, was designed by Benjamin Wyatt and opened in 1812. In 2013 the theatre underwent a refurbishment of the front of house areas, when these areas were restored to be as close to the original 1812 scheme.

Drury Lane Theatre Royal was famous through the latter 19th and early 20th centuries for spectacles, with productions that included chariot races (Ben Hur); the Derby; an earthquake (The Hope); a train crash (The Whip); & sinking ships amongst others.

Miss Saigon was the longest running musical at the theatre, for 10 years between 1989-1999, with a total of over 4,000 performances, each one (or nearly every one!) with a helicopter landing!

The theatre has not been without its incidents, with fires and also an unexploded gas bomb during the Second World War, which did manage to damage the rear of the auditorium even without exploding.

Rodgers & Hammerstein productions during the 1950s at the theatre included Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific and The Kind & I.

Later productions, such as Billy, produced Michael Crawford as a great theatre star. The original Sweeney Todd on the stage was at the theatre in 1980, starring Denis Quilley & Sheila Hancock.

The 2000s brought such classics as The Witches of Eastwick, The League of Gentlemen and Trevor Nunn's Anything Goes. Comedy from The Producers filled the halls with laughter for 2 years, and The Lord of the Rings demonstrated the ability of the theatre to bring new technology to the stage. In 2009 Oliver! Starring Rowan Atkinson and Jodie Prenger was revived by Cameron Mackintosh. Shrek the Musical ran for 2 years from 2011 to 2013 when Charlie and the Chocolate Factory took over the musical stage. Charlie is due to run at least into the middle of 2016, with tickets currently on sale through to June 2016.

The theatre is currently owned and operated by Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Really Useful Group, and has been 100% owned by that company since 2005.